An Unofficial Guide To  
Los Angeles County Law
Enforcement and Fire
Department History Through
Photos, Badges, and Patches
Site last revised 07-14-14.  Click here for latest revisions.
This is an unofficial site dedicated to sharing the history of the Los
Angeles Co. Law Enforcement  and Sheriff's Dept.  All information
contained herein is the sole responsibility of the author and does not
reflect any opinions of the Department.
This is a pictorial reference of badges, pictures and items pertaining to the
Los Angeles County from 1850 to present. All the badges depicted are
genuine Los Angeles County issue unless specified as a replica, fake, etc.

The material contained on this site is for reference
only and
NOT FOR SALE or TRADE!

Any contributions of pictures or other material to this site are greatly
appreciated.  Many images of badges and items on this site are from
contributors.  My aim is to provide as much reference material as possible
for collectors.
Credit will be given if desired.

WANTED TO BUY
I will be interested in any items such as found on this website, pertaining to
Los Angeles County.  Before offering items to the general public, let me
make a fair offer.  Any items bought will NOT be resold and will become a
part of an important collection to be passed on for future reference.
mike@badgehistory.com
Click to enlarge.
Map of the Los Angeles Co. Sheriff's
Stations.  This doesn't include many
small Service Centers which act like
a substation.

Click on above map to enlarge
and to show all Sheriff's Station
logos.
Old Los Angeles County Seal and Flag
The Goddess Pomona – the goddess of gardens and fruit trees- is holding in her arms a sheaf of grain, an
orange, a lemon, an avocado and a few grapes to represent Los Angeles County’s agriculture.
She stands on the shore of the Pacific Ocean with the San Gabriel Mountains in the background.
The engineering instruments – the triangle and the caliper – relate to the industrial construction complex
of the County and Los Angeles’ vital contribution to the conquest of space.
The Spanish galleon is the San Salvador, which Cabrillo sailed into San Pedro Harbor on October 8, 1542.
The tuna represents the fishing industry of Los Angeles County, and the championship cow, Pearlette,
represents the dairy industry.
The Hollywood Bowl indicates the cultural activities, while the two stars represent the County’s motion
picture and television industries.
The cross represents the influence of the church and the missions of California.
Oil derricks are symbolic of the oil fields that were discovered on Signal Hill.
The words “County of Los Angeles California” surround the seal.
New County Seal for Los Angeles
The Native American woman represents the early inhabitants of the Los Angeles Basin,
including the area we now call Los Angeles County.
She stands on the shore of the Pacific Ocean with the San Gabriel Mountains in the
background.
The engineering instruments‹the triangle and the caliper‹relate to the industrial
construction complex of the County and Los Angeles vital contribution to the conquest of
space.
The Spanish galleon is the San Salvador, which Cabrillo sailed into San Pedro Harbor
October 8, 1542.
The tuna represents the fishing industry of Los Angeles County, and the championship
cow, Pearlette, represents the dairy industry.
The Hollywood Bowl indicates the cultural activities, while the two stars represent the
motion picture and television industries.
Mission San Gabriel, the first in Los Angeles County, represents the historic role of the
missions in the settlement of the Los Angeles region.
The words “County of Los Angeles, California” surround the seal.
Sgt. Joe Friday, LAPD.  He was a fictional character, but
a role model for new cops and deputies in his day.
Click on photo to hear one of his famous speeches.
Best Marine Corps commercial, ever!
fraudulent use of police badges.
Stinkin' Badges quote from Treasure
of the Sierra Madre
Any perceived copyright infringements are
unintentional and will be removed upon request.  
County Seal History

December 9, 1887:  An impression of the County seal(Grapes) was authorized to be sent to the
secretary of state.

June 13, 1939: On motion of Supervisor Hauge, the Board adopted a resolution ordering that
all County cars be suitably labeled by an appropriate insignia, that said insignia should be in
keeping with the dignity and the importance of the County of Los Angeles, and said insignia
should depict and properly display commerce, shipping, agriculture, airplane manufacturing,
the motion picture industry, the petroleum industry and recreation and use the outline of the
County, and in order to attract available and proper talent for the drawing and makeup of the
proposed insignia, proper publicity should be given.  The sum of $100 was to be appropriated
from the General Fund Unappropriated Reserve, 1938-39, to be offered in payment of the best
and most suitable design for such insignia as determined by the Board.

June 28, 1939:  the Board authorized the closure to accept insignias from constestants
effective July 5, 1939.

August 10, 1939:  The Board accepted the design adopted on August 10, 1939, in relation to the
design submitted by Orpha Klinker for the insignia to be placed on County equipment and
authorized payment to her of $100, also County Counsel was instructed to prepare a contract
of release and assignment to the County all copyrights privileges.

January 2, 1957:  The Board adopted a new seal designed by former Supervisor Kenneth Hahn,
drawn by Millard Sheets, and implementation effective March 1, 1957.

September 14, 2004:  The Board approved a modified version of the seal after the ACLU,
claiming it was illegal to include the cross on the seal due to its religious nature, threatened to
take the County to court.  In the redesign, not only was the cross removed, but also the oil
derricks and Goddess Pomona.  Some members of the public had criticized inclusion of the
pagan Goddess Pomona if the cross was to be removed.  A native Indian woman replaced her.   
The oil derricks were removed to make room for a mission, which added to take note of the
settling of the area by the Spaniards.  The decision to change the seal was so controversial that
residents several times circulated petitions to allow a public vote on the matter, but they were
unable to obtain enough signatures to put the issue on the ballot.
Adopted August 10, 1939
Adopted January 2, 1957
Adopted September 14, 2004
Any amount would help
maintain this website.
A Law Enforcement Tragedy
This links to a LASD video reenactment of the
killing of four CHP Officers in Newhall in 1970.  
Click on LASD reenactment, either reg or hi-res.

h
ttp://www.scvtv.com/html/newhall1970-lasd.html

This links to a detailed account of the incident by
the California Highway Patrol

http://www.chp.ca.gov/memorial/newhall.html


Additional link to an account of the Incident.